On of my favorite bloggers, Penelope Trunk, posted an interesting blog about the future. Penelope predicts the changes she foresees when Gen Y (1982-2001) takes the reigns of middle management. Rearden Translation of her first point basically says “Gen Y will work longer hours and not parent as much.”

 

Being squarely situated within Gen X (1965-81), today I am fulfilling her Gen X stereotype – leaving work early to be with the kids. Mackenzie has two major events in her  world today and I’m going. First, we have the pre-school “Teddy Bear Parade.” Not sure what to expect, but I’ll be there to take it all in.

 

Second, we are going to the movies. My wife went to Fandango WEEKS, not days, WEEKS ago to get advance tickets to see High School Musical 3 on the first day out. You would have to understand my 3 year old, but she literally knows every word and every song from the previous HSM movies. Heck, even I know the words and songs now, since they continually play in the back of our grocery getter. Mackenzie has been jabbering about this movie for months. No way would I miss the expression on her little face and sparkle in her eyes when Troy, Gabriella and the whole gang show up on the big screen.

 

In addition to parenting our children, my wife and I (along with other great people I know – Al, Jon, and leaders at CRAVE) spent countless hours “parenting” kids whose parents are too busy being middle management.  I have blogged on this subject a lot, but its time to invest in the lives of your children, regardless of your generation. Children are the legacy we leave. No matter how successful you are, your children will define you. I have a picture in my office I have had since college that says “PRIORITIES – 100 years from now, it will not matter the size of my house, the type of car I drove, or the balance in my bank account, but the world may be different because I was important in the life of a child.” I pray that my life is not defined by my career, but rather by my commitment to investing in my children and future generations.

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